Archive for ‘Disability’

May 22, 2018

Mother’s day for mothers of children with special needs

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It goes without saying that no one in the world can replace the love and place of a mother. From teaching us how to tie our shoelaces for the first time, to guiding us to lead successful lives, being a mom is not an easy job. Yet these amazing women do it with such grace and care, and without a frown on their face.

To recognize and honour these loving and caring souls, who form a pivotal part and parcel of our lives, Mother’s Day was established in 1908. Since then, the day has turned into a popular tradition, wherein we pamper our moms with all sorts of wonderful things. But with that being said, the scenario is different for mothers of children with special needs.
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For mothers of children with special needs, Mother’s Day rarely means a dinner out or jewellery gifts. They do celebrate the day, but they celebrate it in a different way. They find happiness in knowing that they are nurturing their child’s health as well as their own. They take satisfaction in keeping a positive attitude. They take pride in knowing a vast list of medical terminologies and education jargons. They feel happy to become experts on their child’s diagnosis and education plans.
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We, at Mata Bhagwanti Chadha Niketan meet with mothers of children with special needs on a regular basis. They all share their highs and lows with us and we love to interact with them. We understand being a mother of a child with special needs is not an easy job to do. That’s why we conduct training sessions that help them cope with constant pressure and help them raise and understand their kids in a better way. Not only this, we also conduct events that help mothers connect with other mothers of kids with special needs. This helps them share their experiences on a personal level.
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If you are a mom of a child with special needs, then we salute your efforts, and the unconditional love, with which you love and take care of the apple of your eye. We honour you for your constant outpouring of love and goodness. You are the backbone of your family, and no one can ever replace you!

¬Happy Mother’s Day to all of you.

Source: MBCN School

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May 9, 2018

10 Things to Know About Autism Spectrum Disorder

Autism spectrum disorder is basically a wide range of behavioral and developmental disorders that results from a combination of certain traits. The autism spectrum disorder will range from low functioning autism to high functioning autism to normal behavior and to possibly hyper socialization.

An autism spectrum disorder is considered to be a persuasive developmental disorder, which basically means that it interferes with a child’s normal developmental abilities such as communication and speech. Autism spectrum disorders are not specific developmental disorders such as dyslexia. It is important to note that many people who have this disorder usually end up living in dire poverty.

Listed below are 10 things to know about Autism Spectrum Disorder.

  1. At early stages, a child can start to demonstrate the three key signs of autism; impeded social interaction, communication challenges, and tedious behavior.
  2. Young girl who have autistic symptoms might experience the ill effects of Rett Syndrome. The disorder influences commonly females. Development is common up to 6 to 18 months, when motor milestones and language are lost.
  3. Researchers and parents debates on whether autism should be considered as a disability or rather be considered as a personal sort of trait.

4, Though kids with a autism have many issues such as eating and constipation, (for example, repetitive eating), they normally do not have a higher occurrence of gastrointestinal issues than other kids.

  1. Research reveals that having an elderly father increases a child’s danger of autism. Kids who are born to men over 40 years old are just about six times more prone to have an autism issue than those who are born to men more youthful men (30 years of age). The maternal age appears to have little impact on the autism risk
  2. Researchers have discovered that the region of the brain which is known as the amygdala was about large 13% bigger in kids with autism as contrasted to the kids without it.
  3. Autism is more prone than childhood diabetes, cancer and AIDS combined
  4. Ecological factors that could trigger the predisposed genes to undergo mutation and lead to autism are many and could incorporate certain medications, chemicals, heavy exposure to metals, anti-infection agents, prolong TV viewing, fire retardant, or diseases amid pregnancy.
  5. Autism Spectrum Disorders is approximately 5 times more typical among boy child (1 of every 42) than among girl child (1 of every 189). They are additionally reported in all ethnic, racial and socioeconomic groups.
  6. Many researchers believe that autism is a mix of genetic vulnerability that is activated by some sort of social or poisonous influence.

Source: http://www.articles.studio9xb.com/Articles-of-2018/10-things-know-about-autism-spectrum-disorder

April 23, 2018

Specially-abled Friendly Heritage Sites – Because It’s Their Heritage Too!

heritage

World Heritage is the shared wealth of humankind. It brings a sense of unity amongst people as it does not belong to a specific group, caste or community. It belongs to everyone, which includes specially-abled people too. While we talk about providing equality to specially-abled people in every aspect of life, academic or corporate, we often forget about them when it comes to providing access to heritage sites. Some heritage sites, including UNESCO World Heritage Sites, do not have braille signage, while others do not have basic facilities like wheelchair ramps and toilets for specially-abled tourists.

In an unprecedented move by the Indian government, under the initiative “Accessible India” Archaeological Survey of India (ASI) has been asked to audit more than 100 sites across the country. This audit aims to gauge the kind of facilities needed to make those sites accessible to specially-abled people. Though the process will take some time to finish, the groundwork has started at some famous monuments like Taj Mahal, Hampi and Akshardham.

As the world celebrates World Heritage Day on April 12, let’s recognize the 5 heritage sites in Delhi-NCR that are completely or partially accessible to people with special abilities:

1. Qutub Minar – A UNESCO declared World Heritage Site, Qutub Minar is world’s tallest brick minaret with a height of 72.5 metres. An exquisite example of Indo-Islamic Afghan architecture, it attracts more than 3.9 million tourists every year. It is completely accessible to specially-abled tourists as it has ramps and public toilets for people with differences of all levels.

2. The Red Fort – Built by the great Mughal emperor Shah Jahan, this timeless piece of architecture is located right in the heart of Old Delhi. This fort attracts tourists from all over the world. The Red Fort is completely accessible to specially-abled tourists as it is equipped with ramps, and accessible toilets.

3. Humayun’s Tomb – Built in 1570, this ancient tomb was the first garden-tomb in the Indian subcontinent. It is located on Mathura Road, Delhi, which is near the famous tomb of Nizamuddin Auliya.

4.  Akshardham Temple – An architectural marvel, this temple attracts approximately 70 percent of all tourists who visit Delhi. It is situated on the banks of the Yamuna river, which are adjacent to the Commonwealth Games Village. Apart from its world-class structure, Akshardham Temple also boasts of an IMAX feature show, a musical fountain, and large landscaped gardens. This temple is partially accessible to specially-abled tourists.

5. Jantar Mantar – One of the world’s oldest astronomical observatories, the Jantar Mantar was built by Maharaja Jai Singh II of Jaipur. It is a remarkable structure which consists of fourteen geometric devices used for measuring time, forecasting weather changes, predicting behaviour of planets and finding extra-terrestrial altitude. Jantar Mantar is partially accessible to the specially-abled tourists.

It is quite a welcome move from the Indian government who is finally working on the lines of empowering the specially-abled tourists. Other state governments must take inspiration from these heritage sites which are setting a great example for all.

It’s time that we make “Accessible Heritage” a major part of the “Accessible India” campaign and help our specially-abled citizen, who too have an equal right to cherish the beauty of our history and rich heritage.

Source: Specially-abled Friendly Heritage Sites – Because It’s Their Heritage Too!

 

April 11, 2018

International Day of Sport for Development and Peace – Celebrating the Contribution of Sports to Our Lives

International Day of Sport for Development and Peace

Sports is a universal language that transcends every border, real or imaginary. People across nations, religion, cultures and belief systems have joined hands time and again in the name of sports. To celebrate this international phenomenon of people coming together for sports and its contribution in shaping our society, the General Assembly of United Nations has declared 6th April of every year as International Day of Sport for Development and Peace. The date 6th April was chosen to commemorate the inauguration of the first Olympic games of modern era, in 1896, in Athens (Greece).

Sports has played an important role in everyone’s life, be it in the form of a competitive sport, physical activity or recreational play. Children learn to function in competition for the first time while participating in sports, and adults learn to put their differences aside while playing or watching sports. Sports is a great educator, and this is the sole reason it has grown to be an integral part of our society.

Mata Bhagwanti Chadha Niketan, a school for special children, understands the importance of sports in the physical development of its students and its ultimate role in educating the society. Keeping this in mind, MBCN has designed its curriculum in such a way that there is equal focus on academics as well as sports. MBCN encourages and empowers its students who show an interest in sports. It provides in-house training for various sport related activities and events. MBCN students have proven their mettle in various sports such as football, softball, cycling, badminton, etc. at national level championships. Here are MBCN’s 12 shining star sportspersons:

International Day of Sport for Development and Peace is an opportunity to celebrate the achievements of children like these, who have risen above their physical condition and achieved what they truly deserve. On this day, let us recognize the growing contribution of sports to the societal development and the empowerment of our younger generations.

 

March 26, 2018

Raising Awareness on World Down Syndrome Day and Beyond

downsyndrome

Down syndrome is one of the most common chromosome abnormalities in humans, found in one out of every 1000 newborns each year. However, the society, including most of the parents of babies with Down syndrome, has so much to learn about this, especially in developing countries like India.

Keeping this in mind, World Down Syndrome Day (WDSD) was first observed in 2006 in many countries around the world. Acknowledging this, the United Nations General Assembly declared 21 March as World Down Syndrome Day – the 21st day of the third month; to signify the triplication of the 21st chromosome that causes Down syndrome. Here, we are trying to simplify the disorder so that everyone knows and understands the fact that children with this condition are not sick or suffering; they just have one extra chromosome.

What is Down syndrome?
To put it simply, Down syndrome (Trisomy 21) is a chromosomal abnormality where a child is born with three copies of the 21st chromosome (as shown in the picture).

When babies are being developed, they receive 23 chromosomes from their mother contained in her egg and 23 chromosomes from their father contained in his sperm, totalling 46 chromosomes. Children with Down syndrome are born with an extra 21st chromosome.

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Characteristics of children with Down syndrome:
While the effect of this disorder may differ from child to child, most of the affected ones are observed with the following physical characteristics:
● Flat facial features
● Small head and ears
● Short neck
● Bulging tongue
● Upward slanted eyes
● Atypically shaped ears
● Poor muscle tone

Children with Down syndrome usually have some degree of developmental disability, but it’s often mild to moderate. If not paid attention to, the children might show behavioural properties like:
● Impulsive behaviour
● Poor judgment
● Short attention span
● Slow learning capabilities

How to raise a kid with Down syndrome:
First thing a parent should do is learn as much as possible about the condition. After that, one can look for help at other support groups, talk to therapists and get in contact with other parents who have already been through this. Apart from this, here are few things that might help such parents:
● Give your child chores around the house. Just break them up into small steps and be patient
● Have your child play with other kids who do and don’t have Down syndrome
● Keep your expectations high as your child tries and learns new things
● Make time to play, read, have fun, and go out together
● Avoid saying “That’s wrong” to correct mistakes. Instead, say, “Try it again”
● As you work with doctors, therapists, and teachers, focus on your child’s needs rather than on the condition
● Look at what your child is learning at school and see if you can work those lessons into your home life

While all these tips will certainly help your children in the longer run, one thing they need the most from you is love. Kids with Down syndrome need and deserve as much love as other kids.

Contributing towards making the society more understanding towards children with special needs like in the case of Down syndrome, The Ponty Chadha Foundation runs Mata Bhagwanti Chadha Niketan, a school for specially-abled kids. MBCN makes sure that these children get a holistic learning experience and a supportive environment, empowering them to achieve maximum independence while defeating their conditions.

On this World Down Syndrome Day, let us all take a pledge to create a society that is more supportive and loving towards the children with special needs.

January 24, 2018

Republic Day Contest Alert: Guess The Sign & Win BIG

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Republic Day is a pivotal day in India, and as citizens, we take immense pride in celebrating the many facets of being Indian. Besides the vibrant parade on television that has everyone glued to their TV sets at home, it is a day for us to look back at our rich heritage and cultural history, while looking forward and paving the way with opportunities galore for future generations.

Keeping up with the patriotic spirit this year, The Ponty Chadha Foundation is taking the #ConnectingSigns a level up, and is encouraging users to participate in an exciting and brain-tingling contest that will begin on 23rd January, and close on the 25th.

How does the contest work?

Starting 23rd January, The Ponty Chadha Foundation’s Facebook and Twitter pages will share video snippets, which would be cuts from the original ‘National Anthem in Sign Language’ video. The audience will be asked to guess the signs enacted by the special children.

The users will have to guess and comment using the hashtag #GuessTheSign.

Simple, right?

With the invigorating and fun-filled #GuessTheSign contest, The Ponty Chadha Foundation will not just get people to participate and showcase their knowledge on sign language, but it will also be a grand opportunity for lucky winners to walk away with grand prizes.

If you’ve heard it, seen it, and loved it, then this is your chance to play and win!

Visit our Facebook and Twitter pages here, and participate NOW!

 

Source: http://www.mbcnschool.org/blog/r-day-contest-alert-guess-the-sign-win-big/

December 21, 2017

Healing the world… one campaign at a time!

Healing the world… one campaign at a time!

If there is one thing the world needs more than money, it is acceptance. Acceptance of those who can’t speak, hear, or comprehend. Shunning stereotypes around disability is the need of the hour, and as human beings, if we don’t take stock of the situation now, we are headed for utter doom and despair. There are several institutions and government-led bodies that deliberate over such issues, but India has a long way to go in making a difference that truly lasts.

With that being said, 2017 has been a pivotal year for MBCN, as it has led two distinguished campaigns revolving around World Disability Day and sign language. Both campaigns have not just highlighted the pressing issues at hand regarding disability, but have also educated the masses and raised awareness in a way that has had lasting effects.

Let’s start with #ConnectingSigns

This was an initiative by The Ponty Chadha Foundation, which not just taught the masses about sign language and its importance in society, but has also made people realise that specially-abled children, despite their disabilities, have numerous talents and skills that can shape the world in a wonderful and meaningful way.

The MBCN teachers and students went to several institutions and local eateries to share important knowledge on sign language, and taught different gestures, all of which were truly enlightening.

What really topped it all, was the Indian national anthem in sign language, which garnered 2,144,759 views on Facebook, besides reaching 9,664,507 viewers. In addition this, there were 25,000+ shares that really got the ball rolling in the right direction for the overall purpose of this campaign. In a nutshell, many hearts were touched on virtual as well as off-line platforms.

#BeyondDisability

This World Disability Day, the teachers and students at MBCN were on a mission to raise awareness about differently-abled kids, as they went about spreading their messages and thoughts across 100 schools in Noida. Besides generating hope to build a greater understanding around disability, the initiative gave way to open minds and positive attitudes.

Building a child’s self-esteem and self-worth is of paramount importance, especially when it comes to children with disability. Such children have so much to offer, but our regressive ways fail to take this into consideration. According to MBCN teachers, a loving and generous attitude is not just curtailed to the school space, but must be practiced at home too.

Through the #BeyondDisability campaign, the MBCN teachers managed to reach 100,000 students, and instill the power of positivity and love in all.

Source: MBCN Website

November 21, 2017

Eco friendly products by special children of MBCN

Well we all know that in these day there is a growing trend of handmade products and gifts. And today I am going to make you familiar about one such sites. You may ask us there are several sites alike then what make this content special. Yes, this content is special because handmade products may not be the news but these products are made by the students of MBCN. Wait a minute if you are thinking that these products are special because they are made by children then you are wrong. Because they are not just made by children but made by special children. Yes you heard it correct .

Mata Bhagwanti Chadha Niketan (,MBCN) is a school for disabled children. Here they teach for several children with mental impairment and who are physically challenged. Today we came infront of you to proudly present the Eco friendly products made by special children of MBCN. These children made some special products which are Eco friendly and can be useful for giving as gifts or can be used for decorating home.

products-collage

While looking about some of the products they are like paper bags, hanging photo frames, bangle boxes, gift boxes, plain boxes and pearls and beads baskets. They also made some chocolate boxes, gift hampers, designer notebooks, designer dairy sets, dry fruit boxes, ring boxes, Shagun envelopes for household and gift purposes. They also have some items for office purposes like pen stands, office kits and tissue boxes.

And all these things they are just made by using natural materials like paper, cloth, cardboard etc. They doesn’t harm the environment in any way. And one more important thing to know is that they are available in very low prices. They just the starting prices of about 200 rupees and up to a maximum of less than 1000 rupees.

The MBCN work to :-

  • Provide rehabilitation and personal development services and support our students and trainees and provide them with what they need in every area of their lives, maximizing their integration in the main stream.
  • Create the possibility for an optimum quality of life for our students and trainees and their families.
  • Facilitate empowerment of people with disability, their families, care given and communities.

So I suggest this is beneficial both for special children and us so one should not think twice before buying such kind of products as they are available at very low cost and are very beautifully designed. And in another words by buying these items we are encouraging those children and helping them to grow up and to live. Support them with all your heart.

Source: https://www.prlog.org/12677911

November 9, 2017

Learning Kindness Through The Children Of Today

With the world that turns colder and harder by the minute, random acts of kindness are what we need to keep our humane spirit alive. These days, with social media gripping every nerve, we scroll through our Facebook and Twitter news feed, only to be saddened by how cruel and inconsiderate people have become. Whether it is towards other people or animals, there is a dearth of compassion and respect on all levels. With that being said, if there is a ray of hope, it is our children, who remain untouched by the brutal ways of the world. Their innocence and open hearts, willing to love and learn, are like a breath of fresh air for our society, and for the stifled environments we create for ourselves.

When we speak of humanity, it is important to stop and think twice about how we treat those who have some form of disability. Do we laugh at them, or do we reach out to them with a non-judgemental hand? Do we ignore them, or do we include them the same way we include other people? Children, with their pure minds, are free of judgements and inhibitions when it comes to loving and accepting others.

At MBCN, we take immense pride in our kids with special abilities, who set beautiful examples of what kindness means. Our teachers don’t just teach a regular school curriculum, but also teach values and the importance of being a good, kind human being to the children, who soak up these attributes like sponges. These special children are a true embodiment of the larger vision we have for our society, which we hope someday will be free of racism, casteism, and narrow mindsets, giving birth to unkind behaviour.

Children are immanently kind. They don’t judge, they don’t get vicious thoughts, they don’t seek revenge, and they don’t let anger or hatred consume them. They act on instinct, without any expectations, and they love, without keeping a score. Whether it’s offering an old person a seat on the bus or helping an old lady with her grocery bags, children may be years apart in age, but they are years beyond us in wisdom and kindness.

This World Kindness Day, let’s take notes from the little ones, who have so much love and kindness to offer, and who can definitely teach us a thing or two, if not more about humanity!

October 26, 2017

Paving A New Path On World Mental Health Day

One in 4 people are bound to be affected by mental health issues at some point of time in their lives. Whether the issues stem from some sort of trauma or have built up over the years, creating acceptance and awareness around mental health is extremely vital in our society.

When we speak of the corporate world, the word ‘stress’ is commonly used to describe our work and day-to-day activities. In the race to make it big, we often forget to take note of our health, and little things that contribute to our overall well-being. Taking on more work than one can, cracking under pressure, having meltdowns, and forgetting to invest time in relationships are some of the leading causes of depression and other mental illnesses, which creep up over a period of time.

The other side of mental health issues also involves people with disabilities. Certain limitations make it impossible for them to live a holistic life. At the end of the day, it is harder for people with disabilities to lead a life of normalcy. Unlike others who can vent out their frustration through several means and seek counselling, people with disabilities have it harder, and can’t express as freely, or with the same amount of impact. It is, therefore, important for society to take charge and address mental health issues for the disabled in the same light as for those who are able.

With regards to World Mental Health Day, which takes place on October 10th each year, MBCN has initiated a campaign called #WorkNotJudge. The campaign revolves around mental health at the workplace, and the importance of including people with special needs. Besides giving tips on how to cope with day-to-day pressure, the campaign opens doors for those who may wish to seek help, but don’t have a voice to do so.

Going in line with the importance of having a healthy mind, Skills Academy, which is PCF’s brainchild, does a splendid job in instilling confidence and the right amount of skill set in the underprivileged youth, who are capable of so much more than they think they are. From housekeeping to gardening and preparing a 4-course meal like professional chefs, Skills Academy not only provides skill training, but also helps build self esteem and ambition.

At the end of the day, a healthy mind is as important as a healthy body. The road to overcome mental health issues may seem never ending, but with a little effort and love, we can make all the difference in the lives of those who find it difficult to catch the light at the end of the tunnel.