Posts tagged ‘MBCN special school for special children’

November 8, 2017

World Cerebral Palsy Day – One Step At A Time In The Right Direction

In case you haven’t heard of the term before, cerebral palsy is a neurological disorder caused by a brain injury or malformation that occurs while the child’s brain is under development. Cerebral palsy, or what is commonly referred to as CP, affects body movement and muscle coordination. Treatment for cerebral palsy depends on the patient, and the degree to which it affects him or her. The earlier it gets detected, the better chances one has for improvement.

Each year, October 6th is recognised as World Cerebral Palsy Day. Apart from creating awareness, it is an opportunity for one to celebrate and express pride in the many milestones people with cerebral palsy have achieved, despite their limitations. In addition to this, it is an opportunity for communities across the world to create a strong voice for cerebral palsy patients, which in turn, motivates them to go out and change the world for the better.

As an initiative to create a support group, MBCN recently held a #CerebralPalsyDay interaction session with parents of those affected. It was an open forum where they shared their challenges and feelings. Busting certain myths around CP and addressing pivotal issues, was the crux of this session. The parents were extremely happy with this session, and requested for similar sessions in the future as well. Here are some pictures for you to see:

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Cerebral palsy is a condition that needs to be treated with utmost care and concern. There are 17 million people across the world who live with cerebral palsy, and 35 million are closely connected with either a child or an adult who suffers from this condition. While apathy is necessary, educating the masses and creating a bridge of open communication is just as important.

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April 24, 2017

Know the Signs of Autism

Know the Signs of Autism

Know the Signs of Autism

In order to cure any problem, it is important to first actually know that there is a problem.
Unlike most other mental problems, Autism is not a disease that could be easily treated with medicine. It is a neuro developmental disorder characterized by social impairments, cognitive impairments, communication difficulties and repetitive behaviour.

As a parent, nobody wishes for their little one to have any problem but sometimes, in the rush of our lives we often miss out many important things that could actually mean a lot. Such happens in the case of Autism and catching it ideally by the age of eighteen months can make a huge difference and starting early treatment can reduce the disorder’s effects and help your child learn, grow, and thrive.

Autism appears in infancy or early childhood, but can only be diagnosed by a professional until the child is over twenty four months or two years. However, there are signs that could indicate that the child is on the spectrum as early as six months of age.
Every child is unique, so is their rate of development. Hence, the signs and the severity of the symptoms can vary from child to child.

One important thing that parents should look out for is that autism isn’t recognized by the presence of strange behaviour, but from lack of normal behavior. Also some children with autism may appear normal before age 1 or 2 and suddenly “regress” afterwards losing any language or social skills they had previously gained. This is called the regressive type of autism.

Following are some early signs of Autism you must look out for and if your child exhibits any of the following then do not delay in asking your pediatrician or family doctor for an evaluation—

● No smile or warm joyful expressions by six months or thereafter
● No back-and-forth sharing of sounds, smiles or other facial expressions by nine months
● No babbling by 12 months
● No back-and-forth gestures such as pointing, showing, reaching or waving by 12 months
● No words by 16 months
● Doesn’t make noises to get your attention
● Never initiates or respond to cuddling or reach out to be picked up
● No meaningful, two-word phrases (not including imitating or repeating) by 24 months
● Loss of speech, babbling or social skills at any age
● No response to their name (the child may appear deaf)
● No demonstration of interest at anything
● Loss of/avoiding eye contact
● Always wants to be alone
● Difficulty in understanding
● Never expresses own feelings or understands other people’s feelings
● Repeats words or phrases over and over (echolalia)
● Gets upset by minor changes
● Has obsessive interests
● Flaps hands, rocks body, or spins in circles
● Has unusual reactions (over or under-sensitivity) to the way things sound, smell, taste, look, or feel
● Has low to no social skills
● Avoids or resists physical contact
● Demonstrates little safety or danger awareness
● Reverses pronouns (e.g., says “you” instead of “I”)
● Gives unrelated answers to questions

Children with autism may also show some other type of signs which may appear normal but come under ASD symptoms.

● Having unusual interests and behaviors
● Extreme anxiety or having unusual phobias
● Playing with toys the same way every time
● Getting upset over minor changes
● Having obsessive tendencies
● Wanting to keep their things at the same place
● Hyperactivity (very active)
● Impulsivity (acting without thinking)
● Short attention span
● Aggression
● Causing self injury
● Meltdowns
● Unusual eating and sleeping habits
● Unusual mood or emotional reactions
● Lack of fear or more fear than expected
● Having unusual sleeping habits

Article Source: http://www.mbcnschool.org/blog/know-signs-autism/